CEQA Racket Extracts 11th Hour Payoffs Amidst Housing Crisis

A law designed to protect California's environment enables profiteers to exploit the housing crisis and extract payouts Read More

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Browse Events
Thu Jul 12

Danielle Bradbery--known for her 2013 single "Heart of Dixie"--was the season four winner of The Voice. Longtime Nashville songwriter Chuck Wicks had his first big break as a solo artist in 2007 with his song, "Stealing Cinderella."…

Thu Jul 12

Noel Jewkes is one of the premier saxophone players in Northern California. He has worked in the San Francisco Bay Area for over 35 years, and has earned a distinguished reputation with lovers of Jazz music. This website contains…

Fri Jul 13

Wally Schnalle has been playing drums almost 50 years and has a long history of working with San Jose Jazz. For the past 25 years he's been sharing his knowledge and experience as a teacher, bandleader, recording artist, and sideman…

Fri Jul 13-21

As summer kicks into high gear, so will our older Rising Stars as they take you on a funky journey down a familiar brick road in The Wiz! We all know the beloved story of L. Frank Baum\s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: Dorothy, a restless…

Sat Jul 14

Despite her rising popularity, Grammy Award-winning Spanish rapper Mala Rodriguez is keeping it real--insisting on continuing to spit in her native language rather than make a play for a wider English-speaking audience. Favoring beats…

Sat Jul 14

The seventh annual Island Reggae Fest is back with a full day of entertainment celebrating island culture and the reggae lifestyle. The festival has expanded this year with a new attraction titled "Roots & Culture," which will focus…

Sat Jul 14

Join Kevin Wong, host and Bay Area comic, for [email protected] Cap off Second Saturdays on The Alameda with a little caffeine, dessert, and great entertainment! Performers have appeared at the Punch Line, Cobbs, San Jose Improv, Tommy T's,…

Sat Jul 14

The Los Altos Art & Wine Festival is back for its 39th year, bringing handcrafted jewelry, sculpture, paintings, live music, food--and, of course, vino--to downtown Los Altos. At the event, 290 artists and artisans from all over the…

Sun Jul 15

Every Sunday, Cafe Stritch hosts our weekly jam session featuring our house band led by Saxophonist Tim Lin. The house band performs a set from 7PM-8PM, and then the house band leader runs an open jazz jam session. Jazz musicians are…

Thru Jul 15

Pear Theatre's 16th season concludes with a rare foray into musical theatre, Noel Coward's "Oh, Coward!" A witty musical revue in two acts, "Oh, Coward!" features four performers accompanied on piano. Devised by Roderick Cook and…

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Tickets to Alice Cooper

Win tickets to Alice Cooper at City National Civic on August 14. Drawing August 6.

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Music & Clubs

Los Altos Art & Wine Festival

LOCAL FLAVOR: Now almost 40, the Los Altos Art & Wine fest brings 290 artists and creators to the South Bay.

The Los Altos Art & Wine Festival is back for its 39th year, bringing handcrafted jewelry, sculpture, paintings, live music, food—and, of course, vino—to downtown Los Altos. At the event, 290 artists and artisans from all over the country will take over Main and State streets while locals sip, stroll and enjoy… » Read More

Musica en el Jardin at Bing Concert Hall Lawn

MALA NOCHE: Spanish rapper Mala Rodriguez brings the modern sounds of Spain to the Bing Concert Hall Lawn.

Despite her rising popularity, Grammy Award-winning Spanish rapper Mala Rodriguez is keeping it real—insisting on continuing to spit in her native language rather than make a play for a wider English-speaking audience. Favoring beats that incorporate elements of flamenco music, Rodriguez uses the mic to champion feminist ideals. She’ll be joined at… » Read More

Island Reggae Festival at the Fairgrounds

PACIFIC RHYTHM: Hear the sound of the islands from internationally renowned artists like Fiji and Aaradhna.

The seventh annual Island Reggae Fest is back with a full day of entertainment celebrating island culture and the reggae lifestyle. The festival has expanded this year with a new attraction titled “Roots & Culture,” which will focus on Polynesian customs and tradition. Catch global artists like Fiji, who reigns as one… » Read More

Movies

Review: 'The King'

Nancy Rooks was the housekeeper at Graceland when Elvis Presley died in 1977. Toward the end of Eugene Jarecki's documentary The King, she demonstrates the way to make one of his favorite meals, a fried peanut butter and banana sandwich on white bread. "You put the butter in the skillet and do it like you do a grilled cheese sandwich," Rooks explains. This method is slightly different from the one his cook, the late Mary Jenkins, demonstrates in "The Burger and The King," a 1995 BBC program--she toasted the bread first before putting it in the buttered frying pan--but the message is still the same. Elvis gratified every one of his unhealthy habits until the cumulative effects killed him at 42. » Read More

Review: 'Damsel'

According to Hollywood Westerns, women find salvation in the arms of the men who rescue them. Wearing heavy wool prairie skirts and floral print blouses, they stand helpless before Indians, snakes and black-hatted ne'er-do-wells. The classic example features John Wayne retrieving Natalie Wood from the Comanches in The Searchers (1956). But the trope persists even in a beautifully crafted movie like Hostiles, released earlier this year, in which Christian Bale escorts the towering screen goddess Rosamund Pike out of Comanche territory (Those Comanches again! You'd think that white folks would have figured out by now why they're trying to protect their own land). » Read More

The Arts

Won Ju Lim's 'California Dreamin''

What separates the American Dream from the one in California? The color of the sunset. Won Ju Lim's California Dreamin' at the San Jose Museum of Art is alive with it. She projects photographs of an ordinary Los Angeles street scene onto and across the gallery walls. Lim collected that raw footage herself, editing it at the same time that she worked on the sculptural elements filling up the rest of the room.The images feature palm trees standing in formation against a blue sky washed in reds, oranges and yellows. Buildings line the horizon and merge together. Shadows swallow them up. But as your eyes get accustomed to the darkness, they also focus on the sculpture, a model city. » Read More

'Hold These Truths' Remembers Japanese Internment

Jeanne Sakata's father never talked about his internment. He didn't want her to hold any resentment toward her country. He hoped his family could move forward and not look back. Her father was in high school when President Franklin D. Roosevelt authorized Executive Order 9066 to relocate more than 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry, including U.S. citizens, to internment camps following the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. My father would always give me short answers, and then he would change the subject when I would ask about it," Sakata, a Watsonville native, remembers. "After they got out of those camps, many of the nisei--second-generation Japanese Americans--felt that the best way to deal with the trauma was to not talk about it." » Read More

The Surreal History of Anthony Riggs

A mud-colored python wraps its body around a resting angel with magenta hair. She is unconcerned by its proximity and rests both of her hands against its curving belly. At the center of a target, a 1940s pin-up model holds the head of a gray garden snake between her thumb and index finger, its silvery length coils around her right forearm. Faded pink cherry blossoms surround them both as satellites race across the sky. In two separate poses, the right arm of a naked saint is held aloft by the tail end of a black and white snake. Even chubby putti ride, cavort and wrestle with snakes in the paintings made by Anthony Riggs in his new exhibit at the Triton Museum of Art. » Read More

Features & Columns

Silicon Alleys: New Book Chronicles Young Da Vinci's Obsession with Spheres

I first met David Eastis 15 years ago when he presided over the Silicon Valley chapter of Slow Food, originally among the first five chapters the U.S. Eastis was the Shakespearean "mine host" of a gluttonous event at the upscale Flea Street Cafe in Menlo Park, where 56 gastronomes of all shapes and sizes feasted at a snail's pace for over three hours. The resulting May 1, 2003, Metro cover story was the first one I ever wrote and one of the first major features on Slow Food anywhere in the Bay Area. I contributed a bottle of Benedictine to the meal, which felt like a Fellini movie in the slow lane, and then quoted Rabelais and John Ruskin in the story. Such were the days. » Read More

Advice Goddess: I Don't Want to Go to AA Smelling Like Weed

Surprisingly, the road to respect and good standing in the 12-step world does not involve strolling into meetings smelling like you live in a one-bedroom bong. Your taking care not to show up all "I just took a bath in Chanel No. 420!" at meetings lest you trigger any recovering potheads is what I call "empathy in action." I write in my book, Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*ck, that empathy--caring about how your behavior affects others--is "at the root of manners." Rudeness, on the other hand, is the lack of consideration for what one's behavior does to another person. I explain it in the book as a form of theft--theft of "valuable intangibles like people's attention (in the case of cell phone shouters who privatize » Read More

Free Will Astrology: Week of July 11, 2018

Your key theme right now is growth. Let's dig in and analyze its nuances. 1. Not all growth is good for you. It may stretch you too far too fast, beyond your capacity to integrate and use it. 2. Some growth that is good for you doesn't feel good to you. It might force you to transcend comforts that are making you stagnant, and that can be painful. 3. Some growth that's good for you may meet resistance from people close to you; they might prefer you to remain just as you are, and may even experience your growth as a problem. 4. Some growth that isn't particularly good for you may feel pretty good. For instance, you could enjoy working to improve a capacity or skill that is irrelevant to your long-term goals. 5. Some growth is good for you » Read More

Silicon Alleys: For Harlan Ellison, Writing Was a Revolutionary Act of Guerrilla Warfare

In that book, at the height of the Vietnam era, when racist slobs supporting George Wallace predated the racist slobs in the Cult of Trump, Ellison never hesitated to thrash the bejeezus out of any xenophobic rube, anywhere. The same hollow-headed conspiracy trash about blacks, Mexicans, liberals, atheists, commies or hippies "taking over the country" existed then as it does now. The same deranged right wing ammosexuals and their medieval fears poisoned all rational conversation then as they do now. Nothing has changed. What's more, Ellison never sunk to giving ersatz accolades in The Glass Teat. It wasn't his job to be a PR person or a "community builder" for every giddy feel-good show on TV. In one passage he referred to Johnny Carson as » Read More

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