Features & Columns

Rich Jacobs' Move Photography Invades Seeing Things Gallery

Skaters, rockers and photography geeks join forces for post-punk Seeing Things Gallery, Read More

Features

Jason Garner Trades Fast Life for Enlightenment

The venner of charisma can eat some men alive. It made Jason Garner a millionaire but nearly swallowed him whole. He lived the life of a hustler; a trailer park kid who made it to the top, squeezing a dollar out of 15 cents. But he didn't need to push a pool cue or a ponzi scheme-just a product to sell to an underserved market. Rising from the shanty shops of a San Jose flea market, where he sold English-Spanish dictionaries and soccer cleats, Garner became one of the most influential and highly paid executives in the live music industry. » Read More

RocketSkates Bring Electric, Motorized Skates to Life

Peter Treadway zips around an empty parking lot, right across the street from the Graham Middle School in Mountain View, occasionally flashing a toothy smile at the small crowd watching him. He glides effortlessly in figure eights-sometimes around beginners, who stumble, wobble and wave their arms in the air. It looks as though he's on Rollerblades or ice skates, but he never moves his legs-and his feet never come off the ground. » Read More

Former Vietnam Soldier Retraces Steps for Documentary

For six hours, Frank Harper rode his motorcycle in the tropical heat of the South Vietnamese countryside, trying to find someone who would recognize faces in a photo taken nearly four decades before. His beat-up bike took him across rocky dirt roads, past tumbledown shacks and flooded rice paddies that spread across the valley floor below Ta Kou Mountain. This time, to an outsider, the landscape bore no visible signs of war-roads and bases he built nearly 40 years earlier as a Seabee, the Navy's construction battalion, were long since dismantled. » Read More

Pot Clubs Face Uncertain Future in San Jose

Dave Armstrong spent his past professional life chasing scofflaws as a bail bondsman in Boise, Idaho. When Aladdin Bail Bonds bought his firm, he took a few years off to retire, travel and enjoy the financial windfall. Until he got bored. When President Obama talked after his 2008 victory about giving cannabis collectives a pass under federal law provided they followed state rules, it sounded, to him, like a call to action. » Read More

Metro's Low Tech Holiday Gift Guide

Throughout the year, we work at the speed of Silicon Valley. We travel and zip around, we text, we watch our screens and tap on our devices. We embrace the post-millenial digital age. Once a year it all slows down. We take days off work, spend time with one another. We hug, unplug, eat instead of tweet. Cloud storage brings rain to our gardens and snow to the slopes. » Read More

A Defense of Ethical Meat Production

Ask a vegetarian why he or she doesn't eat meat and you'll get a variety of answers: Beef is bad for your health. Cattle are a major contributor to global warming. It's wrong to kill animals. Beef production contributes to world hunger. Cattle ranching leads to a loss of biodiversity. Even those who eat beef sometimes do so with a heavy conscience. For many educated urban dwellers, eating beef is a guilty indulgence at best and a health and environmental scourge at worst. » Read More

'Kill the Messenger' Reconsiders Gary Webb's Legacy

This one has all the ingredients of a dreamed-up Hollywood blockbuster: Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist uncovers a big story involving drugs, the CIA and a guerrilla army. Despite threats and intimidation, he writes an explosive expose and catches national attention. But the fates shift. Our reporter's story is torn apart by the country's leading media; he is betrayed by his own newspaper. Though the big story turns out to be true, the writer commits suicide and becomes a cautionary tale. » Read More

Columns

A History of San Jose's Abandoned Spaces

Sometimes technology really does work for the common good. Just a few short weeks ago, the annual Tech Awards drew hundreds of black ties and yours truly to the McEnery Convention Center. As was announced, the Mouth of the South himself, Ted Turner, legendary founder of CNN and however many movie channels 30 years ago, received the James C. Morgan Global Humanitarian Award. Turner, of course, is not your usual billionaire. He actually gives back. » Read More

Tech Awards Honor Life-Changing Innovators

Sometimes technology really does work for the common good. Just a few short weeks ago, the annual Tech Awards drew hundreds of black ties and yours truly to the McEnery Convention Center. As was announced, the Mouth of the South himself, Ted Turner, legendary founder of CNN and however many movie channels 30 years ago, received the James C. Morgan Global Humanitarian Award. Turner, of course, is not your usual billionaire. He actually gives back. » Read More

San Jose Japantown's History

After 15 years and nearly 500 pages of resulting material, the definitive history of Japantown has finally emerged. San Jose Japantown: A Journey is a vibrant, gargantuan volume, with myriad threads of history from every nook and cranny between Hedding and Empire, from First Street to Tenth Street. The book covers the time period from the 1890s until just a few years ago. On Saturday, Nov. 29, a book launch party will unfold at 1pm at the San Jose Buddhist Church Betsuin. » Read More

Pop-up Retailers Fill Empty Spaces in Downtown San Jose

As is often the case in this town, artists and independent businesses are transforming emptiness into grooviness. Last week, the anti-man-about-town slithered into the defunct San Jose Repertory Theater building to inspect the guts of a bold new initiative. Pop-up retailers have now taken over the lobby of the squandered theater to market their wares for the duration of the holiday season. » Read More