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Gilroy Artist Lands Show in London

South county entrepreneur Katherine Filice finds a new expression Read More

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Gilroy Artist Lands Show in London

Katherine Filice never expected doodles would pave the way for her first ever art show in London. In fact, when she first started putting ink to paper, she wouldn't have thought to show her work to anyone, let alone an entire art fair half a world away. Offering a startling glimpse into everyday emotions, Filice creates pen-and-ink designs in the hopes that her art resonates with others, emphasizing that we are living a shared experience. Even the most well-adjusted people have fleeting moments of intense emotions--feelings of frustration, pain, sorrow or betrayal. An active member in the community and executive creative director of a thriving marketing firm in the heart of downtown Gilroy, Filice has helped many to develop their brand. » Read More

Worlds collide at 'The Propeller Group' exhibit

A few years ago, after getting laid off from Yahoo, I decided to reinvent my life in the most rational way possible: I drew portraits of America's vice presidents with octopuses on their heads. The pictures seemed to have struck a chord with people because they gave me a pile of money on Kickstarter last year to turn the pictures into a book called Veeptopus: Vice Presidents with Octopuses on Their Heads. Life is funny sometimes. My fascination with the vice presidency started when I was 5, flipping through a copy of Newsweek. Walter Mondale was on the cover, standing sheepishly behind Jimmy Carter. "What does a vice president do?" » Read More

Historical Tentacles: 'Veeptopus'

A few years ago, after getting laid off from Yahoo, I decided to reinvent my life in the most rational way possible: I drew portraits of America's vice presidents with octopuses on their heads. The pictures seemed to have struck a chord with people because they gave me a pile of money on Kickstarter last year to turn the pictures into a book called Veeptopus: Vice Presidents with Octopuses on Their Heads. Life is funny sometimes. My fascination with the vice presidency started when I was 5, flipping through a copy of Newsweek. Walter Mondale was on the cover, standing sheepishly behind Jimmy Carter. "What does a vice president do?" » Read More

Pedro de Lemos' Promised Land

Tourists crowded the Monterey Peninsula this weekend. Unloosed from their large buses, they strode down Ocean Avenue to take photographs of themselves on Carmel Beach. They stood in pairs and quartets indecisively weighing the imperfections of one restaurant before moving on to disparage another. Without asking permission, one woman plucked leaves and flowers from a local's verdant garden. Beads of sweat ran down one man's neck while he smoked a cigarette in the hot sunshine. He flicked the ash and then the butt onto the immaculate sidewalk. Scenes like these don't appear in the paintings of Pedro Joseph de Lemos (1882-1954). » Read More

Local Gaming Upstarts: Supergiant

In September 2009, Amir Rao found himself packing up his desk at Electronic Arts. He was leaving his prized position as a game designer at one of America's biggest video game developers to move back into the house where he grew up--but he wasn't bummed about it. Rao hadn't been sacked. Rather, he had made the weighty decision to return to the suburbs of South San Jose to create something of his own. With the help of his EA colleague Gavin Simon, he would set up camp in his father's house and get to work building a game called Bastion. » Read More

A Culture Warrior Rides High

One of the artists most prominently featured in (Re)Writing the Narrative is making a valiant attempt to speak up for the disenfranchised. Ana Teresa Fernández describes her work as "trying to highlight either some event or a people or a place that has dealt with tension or aggression." In this exhibit, all three of her short video narratives address particular political tensions and aggressive stances toward women and minorities--with Fernandez as the star. What's most astonishing about her work, apart from the ravishing imagery, is her ability to feature herself in a scenario without drawing attention to an invented persona or character. » Read More

Scenes From the Inferno

What better season than autumn to contemplate the meaning of hell. Specifically, Dante Alighieri's Inferno, one third of his 14th-century poem, The Divine Comedy. The artist Michael Mazur created a series of etchings to accompany a translation of the work by Robert Pinsky, a former U.S. Poet Laureate (1997-2000). Mazur's monochromatic response L'Inferno di Dante, on display at the de Saisset Museum, is celebrated for his evocative depiction of Dante's journey and for putting the viewer inside the narrative. We look at the spectral black and white images through Dante's eyes. Just as the author has imagined an entire underworld in verse, Mazur has conjured up its visual equivalent. » Read More

The 'Roots & Wings' of sjDANCEco

Since its founding in 2003, sjDANCEco has bounded, tumbled and twirled its way through 14 seasons, always keeping an eye fixed firmly on the future of dance. The company opens its 15th year with a production that continues this theme, while also acknowledging the work of the artists that have inspired them. Roots & Wings will feature nods to groundbreaking choreographers Doris Humphrey and José Limón-both pioneers in the field of modern dance-as well as new pieces created by the company's resident choreographers, Gary Masters, Maria Basile and Hsiang Hsiu Lin. "We have always been focused on new works," says Masters, one of sjDANCEco's founders. But that's not to say he and his colleagues have no reverence for tradition. » Read More